Ontario Mine Rescue

District Competition Countdown Underway

Mine rescue teams from more than 20 Ontario mines will mark the 90th anniversary of Ontario Mine Rescue, by testing their emergency response skills and knowledge May 8 to 10 in district mine rescue competitions across the province.

Ontario Mine Rescue was established in 1929, a year after an underground fire at the Hollinger Mine in Timmins claimed the lives of 39 miners. Over the ensuing years, OMR has evolved from a fire service to full emergency response service for all underground emergencies.

The competitions organized by Ontario Mine Rescue, a part of Workplace Safety North, will test the teams’ knowledge, firefighting skills, first aid response, use of emergency equipment, and decision-making ability under stress in a simulated underground emergency.

Mine rescue equipment technicians from each mine will also compete in a test of their abilities to service, diagnose and repair the specialized equipment used by teams.

The public and media are welcome to attend district competitions to give communities a chance to see highly trained volunteers in action. Competitions will take place in:

Algoma District Michipicoten Memorial CC, Wawa   May 8 & 9 
Kirkland Lake & Timmins districts  Archie Dillon Sportsplex, Timmins  May 8 & 9
          Districts will alternate teams     
          Technicians Northern College, Timmins/KL Mine Rescue Station  May 7
Red Lake & Thunder Bay districts Cochenour Arena, Red Lake  
          Red Lake teams    May 8
          Thunder Bay teams    May 9
          All Technicians    May 9
Southern District Goderich Memorial Arena, Goderich   May 9
Sudbury & Onaping districts McClelland Community Centre, Copper Cliff    
          Onaping teams    May 8
          Sudbury teams    May 9

The winner of each district competition, to be announced May 10, will compete in the 2019 Provincial Competition, June 4 to 7, at Newmont Goldcorp’s Red Lake Gold Mines in Red Lake.

Mine rescue competitions, which started in Ontario in 1950, are as much intensive learning opportunities as a chance to test emergency response capabilities. The competitions ensure that mine rescue volunteers across the province are trained to the same high standards.

Mine rescue team members, the backbone of Ontario Mine Rescue, are volunteer mine workers trained by Mine Rescue Officers to respond to all types of mine emergencies including fires, explosions and falls of ground. 

Under the authority of the Occupational Health and Safety Act and headquartered in Sudbury, Ontario Mine Rescue staffs, equips and maintains a network of mine rescue stations across the province that ensure mines within a specified geographic area have adequate emergency response capability.

Workplace Safety North provides products and services to promote workplace health and safety in the mining, forestry, and paper, printing and converting industries, as well as workplaces across northern Ontario.

  

Ontario Mine Rescue volunteers star in video series

Ontario Mine Rescue family and families are playing a starring role in a video series, Drägerman Stories, produced and released by Dräger Safety.

Drägerman Stories Drägerman Boutet Drägerman Hensher Drägerman Joliat
Drägerman Duffy Drägerman Wilson Drägerman Lundrigan Drägerman Hagan

 

About Us 

Under the authority of the Occupational Health and Safety Act and headquartered in Sudbury, Ontario Mine Rescue staffs, equips and maintains a network of mine rescue stations across the province that ensure mines within a specified geographic area have adequate emergency response capability.Ontario Mine Rescue, a part of Workplace Safety North (WSN), has trained and equipped thousands of volunteers who have fought fires, rescued injured personnel, and responded professionally to a wide array of incidents in the province's mines over the past eight decades. 

Our role includes delivering training to first responders, providing consultations, conducting periodic audits, ensuring WSN-owned equipment is maintained to manufacturers' recommended standards, and providing advice during mine emergencies.

Since its creation in 1929, Ontario Mine Rescue has established a reputation for high standards in training, equipment and emergency response, as well as in the development of safe, effective mine rescue practices. We have served as a role model for the establishment of training and safety programs for mine rescue organizations in other provinces and countries.

WSN maintains a Mine Rescue Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) that provides advice and guidance to Ontario Mine Rescue. Under the leadership of the committee, we remain committed to continual improvement, ensuring the mining industry's mine rescue needs are met.

Ontario Mine Rescue video